Author Archive

That wild caught shrimp you just ate? It might be from a skanky, destructive farm

That wild caught shrimp you just ate? It might be from a skanky, destructive farm

Like lots of people, you probably love shrimp. Love to eat them that is. And hopefully you know, shrimp farming is highly destructive. To make a shrimp farm, you first clear out all the mangroves, destroying a critical coastal ecosystem.  Mangrove loss results in greater storm and tsunami impacts, greatly reduced fisheries production (mangrove roots, […]


Academic-NGO partnerships to optimize and utilize conservation science

Academic-NGO partnerships to optimize and utilize conservation science

Problems: (1) Many academic scientists in conservation biology are isolated from end-users of their work, including policy makers, stakeholders, and conservation NGOs (CNGOs). (2) CNGOs rely on science and scientists, however, a science staff is very expensive to maintain. Assumptions: (1) Science is valuable and useful to CNGOs. (2) Some academic scientists want to produce […]


New tools for science collaboration

New tools for science collaboration

The problem with science is email. You all know what I mean. Nearly everything we do is done via email. On the one hand, email is faster than snail mail and enables me to effortlessly share large amounts of information via attachments, links, etc.  Email – even more than Word, r, and Excel – is the nexus […]


Threatened staghorn coral invades Fort Lauderdale!

Threatened staghorn coral invades Fort Lauderdale!

Last week I was visiting FIU and talking with Lionfish guru Zack Judd when the topic of the Acropora range shift came up.  He and Laura Bhatti wanted to take me to do something fun on my last day in Miami.  So we decided on snorkeling off the beach on the world famous Fort Lauderdale strip […]


Coral reef resilience: a biogeographic perspective

Coral reef resilience: a biogeographic perspective

Coral reefs are affected by a large range of disturbances including disease, bleaching, storms, and Acanthaster planci, also known as crown of thorn starfish (COTS) outbreaks.  There appears to be a lot of variation of how much coral cover is affected by physical and biological disturbances and in how quickly coral communities recover from it.  Those two […]


Recent and future impacts of ocean warming on marine biodiversity

Recent and future impacts of ocean warming on marine biodiversity

I am a (relatively junior) member of an NCEAS/NSF funded international working group that is assessing how climate change is affecting ocean ecosystems.  Today, we published our third major paper (in Nature; Burrows et al. 2014), that predicts how ocean warming will affect global patterns of Biodiversity. Read a nice non-technical summary here and a nice summary […]


Top 5 Things I Learned at The Benthic Ecology Meeting 2014

Justin Baumann has a very nice piece on his first experience at the Benthic Ecology Meeting here. I was really impressed by his insight and the general maturity of his post. I am on Justin’s committee but I haven’t interacted with him enough to get this clear a sense of what he is doing and thinking. […]


Congress considers Magnuson-Stevens

Congress considers Magnuson-Stevens

Note, below are materials for a guest lecture I am giving tomorrow in Dr. Elizabeth Havice‘s Geography 435: Environmental Politics class (at UNC).   Congress is currently considering reauthorizing (and tweaking) the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act.  A National Academy of Science report found that the law has worked relatively well (e.g., in reducing the number of […]


Ovik Banerjee 1989-2014

Ovik Banerjee 1989-2014

I regret sharing the devastating news that Ovik Banerjee passed away last Monday.  He was only 24. Ovik worked in our lab in 2011. He and Amanda and Juan de spent the summer that year in Muisne Ecuador, working on a mangrove restoration – blue carbon project (DelVecchia et al. 2013).  This is what Ovik […]


Pipeline as you’ve never seen it before


Scientists as advocates and is climate change really bo-ho-horing?

There has been a broad, intense, and interesting discussion about science outreach sparked by Gavin Schmidt’s talk at AGU this year (below). The Yale forum has a great piece on it, breaking down some of Gavin’s main points: Scientists must be careful, however, and follow a handful of rules of engagement that will protect their […]


Just a green crab, doin green crab thangs

I love science rap.  Especially rap by Eric Axelman:


Do the facts matter?

Do the facts matter?

Chris Mooney has an interesting piece on whether the climate change “consensus” is a useful policy approach. Is it changing the minds of people that formerly didn’t “believe in” climate change? And more broadly whether facts ever change minds. As two top researchers studying the science of science communication—a hot new field that combines public opinion research […]


Q: What does the new IPCC report say about sea level rise?

Q: What does the new IPCC report say about sea level rise?

A: Nothing good. See the plot below of observed past and predicted future sea level (rise). Note the two plotted future scenarios are based on the new Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs): plausible trends in atmospheric CO2 (and other greenhouse gases) concentration named for the corresponding additional heat retained by 2100 in W m-2. For the past, proxy data are shown […]


How much will the earth warm during your lifetime?

How much will the earth warm during your lifetime?

Amazing interactive graphic on the Guardian.  Check it out!  This is me:


Advice from a mangrove

Advice from a mangrove

Photo Credit: Neil Hammerschlag


What we know about coral loss

What we know about coral loss

See updates below in red Without empirical evidence that a population or guild of critters is declining it is pretty hard to understand why they are becoming scarce or to justify any remediation. This kind of work is essentially ecological bookkeeping. Or a form of empirical environmental journalism. I hear all the time from science […]


My congressional testimony on Magnuson-Stevens

I will be testifying tomorrow before the Committee on Natural Resources on the Reauthorization of the Magnuson Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. Watch the hearing live here. This is my opening statement: Chairman Hastings and Ranking Member DeFazio, My name is John Bruno and I am a marine community ecologist and Professor of Biology at […]


Top 10 crazy things said about climate change

10) “It could just be a shift on the axis.” —Congressman Bill Cassidy (R-LA) 9) “[Climate Change] led to the Vikings dominating Europe for several hundred years.” —Congressman Morgan Griffith (R-VA) 8) “Every cow in the world, you know, when they do what they do, you’ve got more carbon dioxide.” —Speaker of the House John […]


Danger Reef

Joe says view the HD version if possible!


Global imprint of climate change on marine life

Global imprint of climate change on marine life

An NCEAS working group I was a minor participant in has an important new paper out in Nature Climate Change (Poloczanska et al 2013 PDF). Summary: We synthesized all available studies of the consistency of marine ecological observations with expectations under climate change. This yielded a metadatabase of 1,735 marine biological responses for which either regional or global climate […]


Mapping projected ocean acidification


Meet the new Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)

Meet the new Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has replaced their older climate change scenarios with ‘Representative Concentration Pathways’ (RCPs) developed for IPCC AR5 report, scheduled to be published in 2014. Unlike the scenarios they replace (A1, B1, A1F1, etc.), the RCPs are not based on social, technological, and economic storylines. Instead, they are simply plausible […]


Continued coral reef accretion requires vastly reduced CO2 emissions

Continued coral reef accretion requires vastly reduced CO2 emissions

An important new modeling study (Kennedy et al 2013  download PDF) forecasts the structural decay of Caribbean reefs based on emission scenarios from the new ‘representative concentration pathways’ (RCPs). Excerpted  Authors Summary: Coral reefs face multiple anthropogenic threats, from pollution and overfishing to the dual effects of greenhouse gas emissions: rising sea temperature and ocean […]