Posts Tagged ‘coral reefs’

Mapping projected ocean acidification


Continued coral reef accretion requires vastly reduced CO2 emissions

Continued coral reef accretion requires vastly reduced CO2 emissions

An important new modeling study (Kennedy et al 2013  download PDF) forecasts the structural decay of Caribbean reefs based on emission scenarios from the new ‘representative concentration pathways’ (RCPs). Excerpted  Authors Summary: Coral reefs face multiple anthropogenic threats, from pollution and overfishing to the dual effects of greenhouse gas emissions: rising sea temperature and ocean [...]


The coral reef baselines survey

The coral reef baselines survey

“The tragedy of recent coral reef decline is that too few people actually know what coral reefs are supposed to be like, and too few of those who now study reefs witnessed what coral reefs used to be like decades ago.” (Peter Sale and Alina Szmant from the Reef Reminiscences Report) I am fascinated by [...]


Are unreasonably harsh reviewers retarding the pace of coral reef science?

Are unreasonably harsh reviewers retarding the pace of coral reef science?

I just published my first PeerJ Preprint here! Abstract: Identifying the baseline or natural state of an ecosystem is a critical step in effective conservation and restoration. Like most marine ecosystems, coral reefs are being degraded by human activities: corals and fish have declined in abundance and seaweeds, or macroalgae, have become more prevalent. The challenge [...]


A glass half full view of coral reef conservation

A glass half full view of coral reef conservation

A glass half full view of coral reef conservation from Dr Tim McClanahan, a field ecologist for WCS. As we mark Earth Day this year with a recognition of “the face of climate change,” it is clear that the greatest threat to coral reef ecosystems is rising sea temperatures. With corals across the globe bleaching [...]


Call me coral


Mikono ya Wavuvi (In Fishermen’s Hands)

This excellent video is by  Austin Humphries, a PhD student working with Tim McClanahan in Kenya on coral reef ecology and conservation.  It recently won the People’s Choice Award at the Beneath the Waves Film Festival!  Check it out.


All Reef Creatures Great and Small

All Reef Creatures Great and Small

In a follow up to our interview with Prof. Charles Sheppard about his latest expedition to the Chagos Archipelago, here is PhD researcher Catherine Head in an exclusive Seamonster guest post giving us a glimpse of the incredible hidden word of coral reef cryptofauna. Chagos for me is what it’s all about, it represents why [...]


Fungia up close

Fungia up close

                      I took this close up photo of the coral Fungia last week off the central Pacific island of Raiatea while on an amazing cruise on the SSV Robert C Seamans with SEA Semester.  I used  the incredible new Olympus Tough camera.  Those are tentacles you can see protruding from the [...]


Mark Hixon’s lionfish Tedx

This is a talk by Marine Ecologist and reef fish ecology expert Dr Mark Hixon of OSU.  I love it!  Mark and I apparently have a lot in common.  I love my job too.  But the special knowledge it gives you – the painful and needless loss of the ocean’s biodiversity – can be a [...]


Lifestyles of the species-rich and famous

Lifestyles of the species-rich and famous

Below is a guest post (her first!) by Dr Emily Darling, about one of the 17 chapters of her PhD dissertation: The ongoing loss of coral cover and flattening of reef architecture is leading to dramatic and drastic changes for coral reef ecosystems. But not all reef-building corals are affected in the same way. We [...]


coral reefs of Fiji – amazing

relax and enjoy  


Drew Harvell’s Palmyra diary

Drew Harvell's Palmyra diary

My friend, colleague and post doc mentor Dr Drew Harvell of Cornell Uni is on Palmyra Atoll, a tiny coral island in the central Pacific.  Drew is leading a coral disease workshop and doing field work on this very pristine coral reef.  I’m jealous!  She is blogging about her work and experiences here.  See more of [...]


Opinons on the GBR coralapocalypse

There is no shortage of opinions about what the GBR coral loss reported Monday (De’ath et al 2012 in PNAS) means and what we should do about it.  Below is a guest post by William Precht.  Bill is based in south Florida and recently left the NOAA program to go back to consulting, primarily on coral [...]


Exploring Bloody Bay wall

A winner from the Blue Oceans Film Festival. Compass Light Productions- David Conover, Mish Morgenstern, Peter Neill Exec Prod. A neuroscientist, marine geologist, and an underwater photographer each pursue their own questions at Bloody Bay Wall on Little Cayman Island.  We see how the diversity of reef life provides practical solutions to diverse human needs


The GBR is losing coral even faster than assumed

The GBR is losing coral even faster than assumed

Elizabeth Selig and I took a lot of heat when we published a paper in 2007 (Bruno and Selig at PLoS One) in which we found the state of western Pacific reefs in general and the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in particular was much worse than assumed: The results of our analysis of 6001 quantitative [...]


The coral jungle – from The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau

One thing that inspired me to become a coral reef biologist is this episode of The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau: This episode first aired in the spring of 1968 when I was only 3, so I must have seen a rerun.  Like practically every marine scientist of my generation, waiting for “The Undersea World” [...]


Seafood mislabeling in Belize

Seafood mislabeling in Belize

This post was co-authored with Courtney Cox, a PhD student in my lab at UNC, studying fisheries management and reef resilience in Belize. Our paper on seafood mislabeling in Belize is out in Conservation Letters (here).  This paper is the fist of several from our project designed to evaluate the effectiveness of Belize’s national ban on [...]


What to do when the oceans rise

What to do when the oceans rise

Last week I published my first book review at PLoS Biology with UNC undergraduate Lauren-Kristine Pryzant.  We read and wrote about Tim McClanahan and Josh Cinner’s excellent new book, “Adapting to a Changing Environment: Confronting the Consequences of Climate Change“.   We tried to bring the lessons in the book from Africa home by discussing climate [...]


Finding fish in the wrong place

Finding fish in the wrong place

This gorgeous woodcut print is the work of Jenny Pope, one of my favourite printmakers. Lots of her art is available to buy on her website and she’s promised me she will soon be blogging about lionfish. But first, here are my thoughts on seeing my first lionfish in the wrong place. Before I arrived [...]


Five things I didn’t know about the ocean

Five things I didn't know about the ocean

My review of Professor Callum Roberts’ new book The Ocean of Life has just come out in Toronto’s Globe and Mail. This is the follow up to his first book An unnatural history of the sea (it was one of the Five Books I picked for the Browser) – it dives into the history of how we’ve stripped [...]


Goodbye to Belize

Goodbye to Belize

[The final post in our Belize series from the New York Times Scientist at Work blog]: Tuesday, July 10 As the days tick away, so do our last hopes of finding social shrimp. We came to Carrie Bow to collect two types of eusocial shrimp, each living in colonies with a single queen and dozens [...]


Demise of reefs in Belize? Coda

Demise of reefs in Belize? Coda

[I was happy to receive a lot of comments on our most recent blog post from the field in the New York Times. Since the space available to respond to those comments on the NYT site is limited, I've elected to do so here.] Thanks to all for your comments. I have always considered myself [...]


Reef Reminiscences: The way coral reefs were

Reef Reminiscences: The way coral reefs were

What was the world like back in the day? Are the fantastic stories all just legends? With the notable exception of Jacques Cousteau, few people were taking pictures of the undersea world a few decades ago, not only because the technology was more difficult and expensive and less available, but also because we tend to [...]