Posts Tagged ‘heros’

Coolification of scientists – live!

Coolification of scientists - live!

[Editor's note: This is the second guest post from our intrepid graduate student teachers and heroes of scientific awesomeness Lindsey Kraatz, Sam Lake, Daniel Maxey, and Stephanie Salisbury. This post is a companion to their interview on NPR, which you can listen to here:  With Good Reason. Thanks for making us all seem cooler. Y'all rock!] [...]


Sculpture of an ocean hero

Sculpture of an ocean hero

A little while ago I went to Silicon Valley to attend the SciFoo unconference at the headquarters of Google. I loved the series of sculptures around the grounds depicting ocean explorers – why ocean explorers? I’ve no idea. This is the one that most people recognized.


Happy Birthday Genie Clark

Today is Eugenie Clark’s 90th Birthday. HAPPY BIRTHDAY GENIE! To celebrate I’m reposting my story about meeting my shark hero last year.  They say never meet your heros, but after meeting one of mine I can thoroughly recommend it. During my recent visit to Mote Marine Labs in Florida I had the chance to meet Eugenie Clark – [...]


On this day in 1642 . . .

. . . the great physicist, applied mathematician, and astronomer Galileo Galilei passed from this world into the annals of history, having spent the last ten of his 77 years on Earth under house arrest for the crime of telling the truth. More specifically, for asserting that the movements of heavenly bodies he had deduced [...]


Three ocean scientists receive Heinz awards

Shout-out to three of our colleagues who’ve received the prestigious Heinz award for work that benefits the environment. The Pittsburgh-based Heinz Family Foundation has presented the awards since 1994 in memory of Sen. John Heinz III. From the WaPO: “Teresa Heinz told The Associated Press that the awards recognized innovative approaches to serious topics for [...]


Never tattoo a fish

I’m a huge fan of Demetri Martin. Here’s one of his puppet blogs with an aquatic theme…


Crabes et Crevettes (1929) – Part II

Second part of Jean Painlevé’s classic, crustacean-inspired movie.


Genie Clark, The Shark Lady

They say never meet your heros, but after meeting one of mine I can thoroughly recommend it. During my recent visit to Mote Marine Labs in Florida I had the chance to meet Eugenie Clark – aka The Shark Lady – and what a wonderful lady she is. I’d arranged to have lunch with Genie the [...]


When Scientists were Poets. And artists.

Ah, those were the days. Back when scientists were not just technicians tickling keyboards and gingerly thumbing pipettes filled with tiny volumes of nucleic acids — but the Poets of Nature. Like the ancient druids, our forebears in the profession were often consummate Renaissance Men (indeed, they were mostly men in those benighted times, though [...]


Shrimp farming: a green (blue) future?

I love shrimp. Not just as sources of surprising insights into the evolution of social life. They’re tasty too. Too much so in fact. Despite my attempts to fit into a dainty little ecological footprint, I’ve always found it difficult to pass up shrimp on the menu despite the fact that they’re generally considered by [...]


Teach your children well

Many of us of a certain age credit Jacques Cousteau with the inspiration that got us excited about marine life and started, or at least helped, us down the path to a life dedicated to the oceans. It’s not an exaggeration to say that Cousteau almost single-handedly created a human constituency for the oceans. Last [...]


The Silent World

A few months ago I happened to pick up a copy of Jacques Cousteau’s classic first book, The Silent World, less from a burning desire to read it than for the mysterious and evocative cover photo, and out of a sense of comradely solidarity with this pioneer submariner. It gathered dust on my bedside table [...]